Canine first aid

Canine first aid

Sharing essential skills to keep dogs safe and healthy is fundamental to the K9HS ethos and embraces our philosophy that we are “all about the dog”.

Current Canine First Aid is constantly evolving and advancing alongside the progress in veterinary medicine and science. We all wish to offer the best possible canine care and know how important it is to update our skills.

Canine courses, qualifications and CPD training experiences focus on ensuring safe practice, using proactive health checks and choosing appropriate assessment and treatment techniques.

We believe in working with each dog to build a positive professional bond of calm, focused trust and active engagement. We choose to use Canine Movement Enrichment techniques to optimise each dogs motion and day to day activities.

Canine First Aid Box

As a canine professional, it's essential to be organised and fully prepared. Having everything you need in one place can be a life-saver in the event of a canine emergency.

Organising a canine first aid box needs to incorporated into your practice CPD training and protocols.

First aid refresher courses are a professional obligation to ensure current safe practice.
image

It's essential to itemise and date your consumables in your first aid kit. Make sure your chosen site to store your canine first aid kit is convenient and easy to access. It should be stored somewhere dry and cool, ruling out certain areas such as wet rooms.

Emergency numbers

When it comes to certain emergencies, you will need to rely on professional help so it’s incredibly important to have convenient access to the phone numbers that count. You will need the number of your local veterinary surgeons practice or their emergency line in case they’re closed.

💡

Top Tip: Include your local poison control centre or hotline number with your emergency numbers.

Clear instructions on how to get to the emergency vets will be useful in case someone else has to drive there.

First Aid box contents

  • Gauze swabs
  • Sterile dressings of varying sizes
  • Padding bandage rolls of varying sizes
  • Conforming bandage of varying sizes
  • Cohesive bandage of varying sizes
  • Antiseptic wipes
  • Ice pack in your freezer to reduce swelling
  • Non-latex disposable gloves
  • Scissors (with blunt ends)
image
  • Sterile saline solution (sold at pharmacies) to flush out wounds, eyes or mouth
  • Tweezers to remove insect stings / thorns / splinters
  • Tick remover
  • Micropore tape
  • Muzzles or equipment to make a home made muzzle
  • Foil blanket to keep dog warm
  • Thick large towel (to transport the dog)
  • Copy of canine emergency numbers

🐾

If you don't have all the appropriate materials to build your own first aid kit, see the links below of places to purchase the various bandaging materials along with complete first aid kits;

🐶

Below are our Oneshot Inside K9HS videos to guide you on how best to devise your first aid annotated storyboards for your course evidence for your first aid unit or course.

1. CPR
2. Bandaging

Below is lovely Gem, a female 13 year old Border Collie and our canine first aid model. This visual series is to show the step by step bandaging of her paw we demonstrate in the Canine Technical Videos (K9TVs) in your Course Manual.

Check out the step by step photo sequence below.

🐾

The primary layer is the contact layer and represents the non adhesive dressing you would place onto the wound. The dressings come in different sizes and usually have a shiny side which you need to place onto the wound. Try to handle the dressing at the corners to prevent contamination.

🐾

The next step is to apply the absorbent or secondary layer which is a padding layer to prevent the wound from being bandaged too tightly and absorbs excess exudate from the wound.

image
image
image
image
image
image
image
image
image
image
image
image
image
image
image
image
image
image
image
image
image
image
image
image
image

🐾

Next is the conforming layer which provides mild pressure and conforms the absorbent padding layer to the limb. It is important to overlap this layer by one third and apply equal tension along the limb to prevent high pressure areas, which may lead to swelling.

image
image
image
image
image
image
image
image
image
image
image
image
image
image
image
image
image
image
image

🐾

The support / outer layer is a cohesive bandage that is conforming in nature and covered in a thin layer of latex. This enables it to cling to itself but not to the animal's skin or fur and it serves as the outer protective layer.

image
image
image
image
image
image
image
image
image
image
image
image
image
image
image
image
image

image
image

image

This K9HS Practical Hub was produced for you and is owned by K9HS Courses.